A few weeks ago, Terry and I made another trip to Lexington, VA. While we didn’t have quite the adventure of driving in circles Read here like we did last year, it’s never without adventure. In fact, life with Terry is an adventure. It’s just how we roll.

Considering the weather was quite the norm we’ve been accustomed to this winter, cold, rainy, and yucky., we didn’t want to stay cooped up in our hotel until Amy’s track meet began. So, we decided to make a visit to the Lee Chapel https://www.wlu.edu/lee-chapel-and-museum. Terry is very fond of Robert E Lee and wanted to learn more and I love history.

Interestingly, it was Robert E Lee, as President of Washington University, who saw the need and had a vision for this chapel. As the number of students began to grow at what was then called, he saw and increased the need for a building to house the student body in one location for worship and assembly. The construction completed in 1868, and the same day it was inaugurated, commencement services were also held in Lee Chapel.

They held chapel on a daily basis and it is said that Lee attended every day and sat here.

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After chapel, Lee would then retire to his office in the lower section of the building. According to our guide, this is precisely how Lee left his office. She said the only thing different is the carpet and the tablecloth, everything is just as he left it before his death in 1870.

We were not allowed to use the flash inside the building and this is about the best I could do with my phone. My favorite piece in his office is this one.

As I was commenting on the details of this exquisite piece of furniture, talking with my hands and I often do, I apparently got too close to the alarm. Set the darn thing off and the sweet lady I was talking with said, ”You’re a little too close. You’ll have to back up.” Never thought my talking arms could cause such a raucous. Terry snickered and acted as if nothing happened, Didn’t matter much anyway because we were the only ones there.

Upon Lee’s death on October 12, 1970, he was buried in the basement of the Lee Chapel.

There are many other pieces of history we discovered in just a few hours timeframe, and I will be sharing more along with pictures and maybe, just maybe, I’ll throw in a Terry video.

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